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Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 8:41 pm
by Gdog
Gotta agree with Dave. Bolt snaps have worked well for me for years.

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 5:03 pm
by dlh
I don't think this is a real world problem. Bolt snaps are used the world over for securing Stage Bottles, Cameras, etc. If cave divers are okay with it then so am I. A good steel or brass bolt snap is going to be very secure and i've not had one fall of randomly in a Dozen years and 1,000 dives with cameras and stage bottles.

Plus you need to be able to easily attach and remove it yourself in the water to recieve or hand up your camera to a boat. A quick link with the screw is going to be a challenge to remove with heavy PNW gloves. I'd worry that the loose lanyard might be a bit more prone to tangling on stuff.

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 1:17 pm
by inflex
Seems like the $35 lanyard is still flimsy. It protects against a catastrophic failure where the plastic coil breaks, but it's still got the same risks with snap bolt opening or the little nylon loop breaking. I don't trust anything (snap bolt, carabiner, etc) that doesn't have a locking mechanism.

I found some old 5mm accessory cord and rigged up a prototype lanyard. Will see how well it works.

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BCD D Ring-->twist lock carabiner-->jam knot-->butterfly-->butterfly-->figure 8-->girth hitch (could be another jam for more security)

Both carabiners are 50 cent cheapos that I will replace later.

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 12:17 pm
by H20doctor
This is the original clip that I bought back in 2008 never had an issue with it ever.. tough as Nails
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Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 2:50 pm
by Cmjstealth
I used to use carabiners also then one day had a buddy who had air issues at 80ft. After an ascent with him grabbing at my bcd to breathe off my octo my camera rig twisted out if the clip and sank out of reach. Offered $1,500 reward and several folks systemstically searched the site over the next week with scooters but was never found. Very expensive lesson. Now I use bolt clips with paracord-like rope tied with figure eight knots. As added bonus the bolt clips dont stick like carabiner gates do when the aluminum develops corrosion. I have two sets of leashes one arm length for during dive and additional one shorter for getting in/out of water and walking. It also means there is redundancy on land and at surface when the risk if dropping feels higher. I had trouble finding off-the-shelf leashes as they didnt seem strong enough for big heavy rigs.

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 2:34 pm
by fmerkel
I use the linked leash. Inside is one of the ubiquitous plastic coils I think, but the webbing 'helps' prevent the coils from snagging (as badly), and provides a fail-safe should the plastic break.

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 2:09 pm
by inflex
https://www.opticaloceansales.com/coile ... -snap.html


Interesting, how do those coil? Metal spring stitched to the webbing?

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 12:51 pm
by dlh
https://www.opticaloceansales.com/coile ... -snap.html

A >good< coiled lanyard like the one above. Brass or stainless steel, attached to the handle of the camera housing. Avoid the crappy plastic ones and don't use the same one for ten years until is disintegrates. I've had the same failure you describe with a crappy rubber coil falling apart in the water.

It should be securely attached to your BC and clipped off short anytime you are not in control of the camera. The long coil is just so you don't loose the camera during an unexpected emergency when you need both hands. (This has saved my camera more than once during an incident)

Re: How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:41 am
by CaptnJack
Tie a bolt snap to your camera. Common lengths are between 0 and 12" the longer ones are basically a dog leash with a SS boltsnap on the end. If its not in your hands clip it off to your chest or butt d-ring depending on the dive.

Things to avoid: 1) any plastic whatsoever. All cords are ~3mm+ nylon paracord and sliding stainless boltsnaps. 2) Anything made by "trident" and sold in recreational dive shops.
I wouldn't use carabiners but that's your choice if you want

How do you secure and protect your camera?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 9:03 am
by inflex
Curious as to how everyone secures their camera when diving. Please include considerations for all activities from before entering the water through getting out of the water.

What prompted this topic is a recent failure of my "system" where a Trident coil lanyard tying the camera to my BCD broke during a dive. The plastic coil sheared right at the crimp (where the plastic coil connects to the nylon strap), and an inspection of my backup lanyard showed some significant cracking at the same spot that could have easily sheared completely as well. Luckily I had a solid grip on the camera, and it was one of the first dives where I actually employed a backup lanyard. This occurrence confirmed something that has always been in the back of my mind--that these lanyards are largely inadequate. I've never completely trusted the lanyards, but there have been times where I've let the camera dangle so I can use both of my hands.

So, I'm off to look for a better system to secure my camera. What do you guys use/do? I'm thinking of tying some nylon 6 (perlon) cord in to form a chain, similar to a climbing PAS anchor (or maybe even just buying a couple of PAS anchors, though they're a bit bulky). That way the loops can be secured together to reduce clutter or extended for range/flexibility when needed. The other consideration is I need something that is relatively easy to manipulate when wearing dry gloves with thick liners.

My current system/practices (camera + strobes weighs ~30lbs and is slightly negative):

2 coil lanyards tied to camera housing, one on each arm
Locking carabiners attaching lanyards to BCD, one on each shoulder strap
Keep lens covers on while entering water
Put lens cover back on at end of safety stop
If receiving from someone on boat, ask person to hold on until I have firm grip on camera, then clip and lock carabiners
If transferring to someone on a boat, transfer camera with both hands. Maintain a lanyard loosely wrapped around my hand until the boat person has a secure hold.

One other practice I've started to employ is setting my camera housing upside down after a dive, such that the sync cord bulk heads and buttons point downward. That seems to reduce salt accumulation and especially reduces corrosion/leakage at the sync cord bulk heads.