Dry gloves. . .

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Sea.Explorer
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Dry gloves. . .

Post by Sea.Explorer » Mon Jan 21, 2008 7:48 pm

I would be interested in hearing from people diving dry gloves:

-What do you use?
-Do you like them?
-What if anything would you do differently?
-Biggest advantage?
-Biggest Disadvantage?

Has anyone switched from dry gloves back to wet glove and if so why?

I am most interested in individuals practical experience than broad generalizations.

Thanks for your input. -Ryan

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airsix
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Re: Dry gloves. . .

Post by airsix » Mon Jan 21, 2008 7:59 pm

-What do you use?

old-school Viking rings

-Do you like them?

ab-so-lutely

-What if anything would you do differently?

smaller diameter rings and seals (the rings fit the seal diameter, but both could be smaller. Of course the suit cuff would also need to be smaller too...)

-Biggest advantage?

Besides warm dry hands... simplicity of design. Less complex than every other ring system I've seen. It doesn't get any more basic, and they just plain work. Works with many different gloves.

-Biggest Disadvantage?

Not the easiest thing to self-don, but doable with a little practice.

Has anyone switched from dry gloves back to wet glove and if so why?

Not a chance.

-Ben

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Post by Burntchef » Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:07 pm

im with ben on the viking classic rings, very cheap, easy to install, no failure points that i have seen. the rings are a bit large though.

ken g here uses the other viking ring set up and i have to say im very impressed with them. i may go to them with my new suit.
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Post by Pez7378 » Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:20 pm

I currently use the DUI ZipGloves. Do I like having Dry gloves? YES!! Are they warm and cozy? YES! Would I get DUI ZipGloves again? NO.

Having Dry Gloves are great. But you want to be able to take them off between dives. Or at the end of dives. Zipgloves are difficult to get off and tricky to put on. As a result you are more likely to put them on, and leave them on. If they leak or are damaged beyond repair, they are VERY expensive to replace. I have two pairs just because I had one pair leak due to small holes in the palm. I repaired the leaks and now have two good pairs.

I will probably not ever go back to neoprene (wet) gloves.

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Post by CaptnJack » Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:45 pm

Had wet gloves for a decade, also often had damp arms due to my pronouced wrist tendons and virtual impossibility of getting a good seal.

Now use the Sitech rings with $5 blue PVC gloves. They work fine with cheap REI fleece liners. Fairly warm hands, esp. for multiple dives.

Can get punctured but not a disaster when it happens. I have just disconnected the ring, removed my equalization tube and replaced the flooded glove. Continued serveral dives this way, no big deal.

Richard

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Post by nice-diver » Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:04 pm

I seen some I wanted some...I bought a set of OS Systems dry glove rings. I love them, I found a set of neoprene dishwashing style gloves that I wore with 3mm wetsuit gloves, warm-dry-protected.

The way the gloves mount on the rings, you buy $75 replacement gloves or make your own out of a latex seals and a set of blue gloves for $25.

I also use a blunt knife to pry them open because I kept pulling the suit ring off, because I didn't want the rings too loose with zipper wax.

I liked the set of northern diver dry rings that I seen yesterday, but the rings looked big and the price was huge at $225
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Post by Ken G » Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:21 pm

I use the Viking bayonet system and so far I am very happy with it.

Took about 10 min to install. Very easy to use with a simple, effective locking design. The only thing I dont like about them is they lengthened my drysuit by about 1" over my old Siteks.


I went from the Sitek rings that were good but I did flood them a few times. The floods were my fault for not making 100% sure they were sealed.

I like the Vikings because this does not happen with them. Once they are locked they are sealed until I unlock the rings again. The Siteks were also not the easiest to get off.

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Post by Grateful Diver » Tue Jan 22, 2008 5:04 am

I use the Diving Concepts rings. And although I like them, I tried once to install them on Cheng's suit and the rings were too big. So I got her a set of the Viking bayonet style rings, and I like them better than the Diving Concepts.

The DC rings are "snap on" ... held in place by the compression of the o-ring. So they're easy to put on and take off.

The Viking rings are "twist on" ... very similar to how one mounts a lens on a camera. And the o-ring compresses as you twist.

Two things I like about the Viking system over the Diving Concepts ... the rings are much easier to install on both the suit and gloves ... and they're less expensive.

I purchased the DC ring sets (no gloves) for $140 ... I purchased the Viking ring sets (no gloves) for $85 ($91.75 with shipping).

I purchased Cheng's Viking ring set at Comdive. I recommend getting the "stripped" version and purchase your own gloves separately ... you can buy the same exact gloves at Seattle Marine for less money than you're likely to pay at your LDS.

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Post by Jeff Kruse » Tue Jan 22, 2008 5:28 am

My wife and I used the OS systems rings. The $5 blue gloves or any ruber glove fit on the rings no problem. It does not cost $75 to replace the gloves. My wife use cheap dishwashing gloves.

A nother thing about the OS system rings is that they are smaller rings than the DC rings. If you have smaller hands then you need to have someone make smaller rings for you. My friend made us much smaller rings. They worked great.

A small amount of silicon grease makes getting the gloves off easy but dont put to much on. I only had a glove come off once at the end of a dive because of ballon hand.

I never put anything in my wrist seal to help equalize.




nice-diver wrote:I seen some I wanted some...I bought a set of OS Systems dry glove rings. I love them, I found a set of neoprene dishwashing style gloves that I wore with 3mm wetsuit gloves, warm-dry-protected.

The way the gloves mount on the rings, you buy $75 replacement gloves or make your own out of a latex seals and a set of blue gloves for $25.

I also use a blunt knife to pry them open because I kept pulling the suit ring off, because I didn't want the rings too loose with zipper wax.

I liked the set of northern diver dry rings that I seen yesterday, but the rings looked big and the price was huge at $225

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Sea.Explorer
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Post by Sea.Explorer » Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:08 am

Thanks everyone for the great replies so far. For those of you with the Viking bayonet style rings, does the set up maintain the use of the suits wrist seals. Could you still dive wet gloves in a pinch without removing the rings? And if so do you find yourself diving with or without an equalization tube?

-Ryan

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Post by dsteding » Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:21 am

Sea.Explorer wrote:Thanks everyone for the great replies so far. For those of you with the Viking bayonet style rings, does the set up maintain the use of the suits wrist seals. Could you still dive wet gloves in a pinch without removing the rings? And if so do you find yourself diving with or without an equalization tube?

-Ryan


Yes, the bayonet rings maintain the use of wrist seals. If they are mounted right, you could probably use wet gloves with the rings on-I actually use wet gloves during the summer and dry gloves in the winter. When I switched a while back I was on a charter and jumped in to find the dry gloves were leaking (mounted on the rings a bit funny). I was actually able to take off the gloves and the suit-side rings in the water and go to wet gloves.

I dive them with a small piece of bungee under the seal to equalize the gloves. I also use a wool army surplus liner, if it gets wet, it still stays warm.

FWIW, I used Si-tech rings, then OS Systems, and now the Viking Bayonet system, of the three, I like the Bayonet system the best. Most secure, easy to install, and the seal is good every time.

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Post by LCF » Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:19 am

You can use wet gloves, but it depends a little on the kind you have. The gauntlet type with the very long wrists won't work very well, but they don't work well with ANY dry glove ring system. On the other hand, it's so quick to replace a damaged glove with this system that, as long as you are carrying spares, you shouldn't ever have to go to wet gloves. (Unless you forget your dry gloves, which I have managed to do in the past.)
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Post by Dmitchell » Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:41 am

Here in Juneau,

Almost all of the local divers are using wet gloves. I've switched back and forth and prefer dry gloves in the winter and wet in the summer. Winter water temps are about 35 degrees and summer are about 45-48 degrees.

I started with Si-tech and though I like the system, the rings are too small for my hands. I found myself pushing the glove off the ring when trying to put the gloves on. This sucks when you have students in the water waiting on you.

Then I went to Diving Concepts. I like the system and after building a glove changing tool. I'm pleased with it. Downside is the rings are uncomfortable when you don't have the gloves on and they are a pain in the butt to install on a suit with small sleeves. I have no problems on my CF200 as the rings stretch. I recently smacked my suit on the truck as I was loading my gear and broke the wrist side ring so for now, I'm back to wet gloves.

Rooting around the shop, I found a set of the Si-tech/Viking rings that DUI sells as the SI-5. We had removed them from a customers suit. I'm fairly certain that they will just snap on to my wrist seals (as opposed to gluing).
If this is the case then I might switch to them for the rest of the winter.

I switch back to wet gloves in the summer because they are just easier to deal with. Mid 40's is no big deal for me it's the 30's that hurt!

I also find that on a working dive, I have to have wet gloves. It's hard to work when you are worried about puncturing a glove.


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Post by nice-diver » Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:42 am

[quote="Jeff Kruse"]My wife and I used the OS systems rings. The $5 blue gloves or any ruber glove fit on the rings no problem. It does not cost $75 to replace the gloves. My wife use cheap dishwashing gloves.

the OS System gloves seal to the glove ring with the inside surface of the glove. The blue gloves that i find on the shelves have a cloth surface that I believe will wick moisture into the glove.

I like the original wrist seal still being there with the ring; it is also easier to get the suit on and off.

I now dive with soda straws (soon to be replaced with vinal tubing), my hands are even warmer and don't trap air so there is no fear of poping off a glove.
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Post by CaptnJack » Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:06 am

Someday you'll have a huge fat hand when a equalization tube slips :)

I have never popped a glove off though, even with fat hand syndrome.

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Post by gcbryan » Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:46 am

I used equalization tubes for quite a while and then just quit using them. I've never had a glove balloon and now I don't have to worry about pulling a tube if a glove leaks. Everyone's different I guess.

Regarding the OP's questions. My experience with the Viking Classic system is like everyone else...great.

I used the OS system for a while and it leaked much of the time, was hard to get off, and sometimes popped off underwater for no reason. I went back to wetgloves until I got a new drysuit with the Viking drygloves.

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Post by Diver_C » Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:46 am

I prefer wet gloves for the tactile sense they give compared to what dry gloves give. However, when the water is colder than 50F, prefer the comfort of warm and dry hands in dry gloves to the very cold and wet of wet gloves. I love my Northern Diver wet gloves, and my OS Systems dry gloves (which don't leak and are relatively easy putting on and taking off). Best of luck deciding what you are going to do!
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Re: Dry gloves. . .

Post by peo » Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:52 am

Sea.Explorer wrote:I would be interested in hearing from people diving dry gloves:

-What do you use?
-Do you like them?
-What if anything would you do differently?
-Biggest advantage?
-Biggest Disadvantage?

Has anyone switched from dry gloves back to wet glove and if so why?

I am most interested in individuals practical experience than broad generalizations.

Thanks for your input. -Ryan



I started off diving exclusively with dry gloves when I lived in Sweden. Since I moved here, I've transitioned to diving wet gloves -- even on long technical dives during the winter. I find that 3mm gloves work fine most of the time, but they do compress (just like your hood) and needs replacement about once a year for me. During a long period, I even cut off the fingertips of my wet gloves to give me more dexterity, but have since gone back to using "unmodified" wet gloves.

I have used the SI-tech ring system, the Viking system with an O-ring sealing behind the ring (not sure if that is sold in the US), and dry gloves with just a latex sleeve without any ring. Of these, I vastly prefer the latter. With some practice you can put on and take off the gloves yourself, and it reduces the bulk of the wrists tremendeously. Of the ring systems I've tried, I prefer the Viking one -- it's bullet proof, very low maintenance and with hardly any failure points.

However, diving wet has some great advantages.

I've never ever cancelled a dive because my wet gloves were leaking. ;-) I still haven't seen a dry glove system that is ALWAYS dry, and when dry gloves DO leak (and, arguably, rightly handled it's RARE), they get horribly cold. I've never had so cold hands as when I've had a leak in my dry gloves. A puncture in a dry glove on a deep decompression dive might become a safety issue - my hand can easily get cold to the point where I'd have to start taking into consideration reduced blood flow through the hand (meaning longer decompression; I've gotten bent once with an issue like this and I'd prefer to not have it happen again), close to zero dexterity which makes it harder to manage gas switches, and the leak might even seep through "straws" or other openings into the rest of my drysuit (this of course gets really hairy if you don't have any latex sleeve inside your ring system, which for example the Viking system that I referred to above does not by default), creating a real thermal hazard.

I also find the wet gloves give me better dexterity, and they are of course easy to put on and take off (just make sure you don't get a pair that has long sleeves -- that works bad with a drysuit).

If your hands are cold, I'd first look at other thermal issues. Is your core warm enough?

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Re: Dry gloves. . .

Post by CaptnJack » Tue Jan 22, 2008 11:12 am

peo wrote:If your hands are cold, I'd first look at other thermal issues. Is your core warm enough?


Peo brings up a good point, if your hands are cold put on a hat! Or in this case make sure your hood is good and well fitted. And that your undergarment is in good condition.

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Post by gcbryan » Tue Jan 22, 2008 11:14 am

Interesting post Peo. I guess everyone is different.

I have had my drygloves leak but my hands were not much colder than a wetglove. I wear fleece liners and when flooded they are still fairly warm once my body warms them up since there is no water flow throught the dryglove with a hole in it. If you totally rip the glove that would be another matter.

My Viking Classic drygloves do have removeable latex wrist seals and I do leave them in place otherwise that would be a real concern for me.

I agree that using wetgloves is no big deal either as long as you get the proper wetgloves.

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Skaana

Post by girldiver » Tue Jan 22, 2008 11:51 am

I've been in the Skaana system for 3 years. Permanently mounted with the latex seal OVER the rings. No equalization tube. No fat hands...no popping glove...really...no issues. Except for the time that I went diving in Canada and thought I forgot my gloves at home. Would have had to McGyver the system with gloves and tape (which apparently happens alot in Nanaimo, as no one shook their head...). Luckily, I had just packed them in the wrong area of my bag and the dive went along.

I will be replacing my gloves (still have the originals) with plain blue so I can use fleece liners. Mine get awfully stinky!!
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Re: Skaana

Post by peo » Tue Jan 22, 2008 11:55 am

girldiver wrote:I've been in the Skaana system for 3 years. Permanently mounted with the latex seal OVER the rings. No equalization tube. No fat hands...no popping glove...really...no issues.


Can you elaborate on what you mean by latex seal OVER the rings?

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Post by airsix » Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:39 pm

Regarding the comments about 'tactile feel' with dry golves I have a few comments.

When I first got my Viking dry gloves years and years ago I didn't really like them because the gloves and inner insulating liners were bulky and gave me fat sloppy fingers. So I often used wet gloves and only used the rings when water temps were in the 30's (I lived at high altitude in Idaho just outside Yellowstone back then).

Last year I did two things that completely changed my dryglove experience forever. First, I got some polypro liner gloves from an outdoor store. These are stretchy thin liners that fit tightly. They are no thicker than a dress sock. Next I got some rubber gauntlet gloves that fit snuggly on my hands and fingers over the poly-pro liners. No slop, no bulk. It is the most tactile glove combination I've ever experienced. You could thread needles and type wearing this combo. I thought I would freeze but this combo has kept me toasty warm in Puget Sound temps. The poly-pro liners are quite effective despite being so thin. If you are suffering from dryglove fat-fingers you've got to try this combo.

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Post by Jeff Kruse » Tue Jan 22, 2008 3:10 pm

Turn the blue glove cuff inside out so you have rubber on the oring. You need to cut the blue glove to the length you want first. Its easy.



nice-diver wrote:
Jeff Kruse wrote:My wife and I used the OS systems rings. The $5 blue gloves or any ruber glove fit on the rings no problem. It does not cost $75 to replace the gloves. My wife use cheap dishwashing gloves.

the OS System gloves seal to the glove ring with the inside surface of the glove. The blue gloves that i find on the shelves have a cloth surface that I believe will wick moisture into the glove.

I like the original wrist seal still being there with the ring; it is also easier to get the suit on and off.

I now dive with soda straws (soon to be replaced with vinal tubing), my hands are even warmer and don't trap air so there is no fear of poping off a glove.

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Post by spatman » Tue Jan 22, 2008 5:23 pm

nice-diver wrote:the OS System gloves seal to the glove ring with the inside surface of the glove. The blue gloves that i find on the shelves have a cloth surface that I believe will wick moisture into the glove.


i had the same problem with my OS rings as well. i use an old pair of thick rubber gloves (that i think are actually Viking gloves. <--see my avatar), with an army surplus wool glove underneath, just like dsteding.

i have only a few dives using them so far, with one flood which was definitely operator error. if they can stay dry, i doubt i'll go back to wet gloves.

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