The Bottle Thread

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H20doctor
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by H20doctor » Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:20 pm

well i founf this gem in the sitka Marina.. stand about 10 inches tall with a square base.. no markings, Nice deep green color
what is it ?
and Am i Rich Now $$$ ????

bottle 1.jpg
bottle 2 neck.jpg
bottle 3.jpg
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Emilyrc
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Emilyrc » Thu Feb 07, 2013 4:57 pm

Hey bassman, how much do you want for the embalming fluid bottles? Lets just say I am in the business and kind of need these. I xan pay you in black market body parts or cash. Take your pick.

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BASSMAN
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by BASSMAN » Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:20 am

Here's a couple of cool finds from Sitka Dive trip.
the small one says "VINO CHINATO" and Also "PADRES WINE TONIC"
and on the bottom "VAIBROS" THE SYRUP POUR BOTTLE HAS NO EMBOSSED BOTTLE MARKS
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by thebottlevault » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:17 am

Hi Alaska-Herb, that Seattle Bottlers Association is pretty common, sorry to say, dates from the 1920-30 period. Would have had a paper label to give soda type and contents. Value probably less that $5 but a fun find. The others are super common, sorry to say. And you are right on the time period for those you listed!

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by thebottlevault » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:25 am

Hi H2ODoctor... ahh... so close on that neat Case Gin bottle. These are pretty common but very attractive old bottles, with nicely applied top and crudeness. They held Dutch Gin, from The Netherlands. They come unembossed like your example, and there are also lots of embossed varients from many Dutch companies. The most common embossed examples are from A. Van Hoboken & Co. The plain bottles like yours have a value of about $10-15, the embossed ones can run from $25 to $200 each. This style of bottle was produced from the 1850's into the 1920's, with the same basic shape. Yours dates from the 1890-1905 time period.

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by thebottlevault » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:28 am

Hi Bassman, the small jar might have been a small glass for drinking the VINO CHINATO / PADRES WINE TONIC."

Your syrup / cruet glassware is pretty cool, again no real value but an unusual find. Based on the style of the pressed glass I would say 1910-1920 on that one.

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by H20doctor » Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:07 pm

thebottlevault wrote:Hi H2ODoctor... ahh... so close on that neat Case Gin bottle. These are pretty common but very attractive old bottles, with nicely applied top and crudeness. They held Dutch Gin, from The Netherlands. They come unembossed like your example, and there are also lots of embossed varients from many Dutch companies. The most common embossed examples are from A. Van Hoboken & Co. The plain bottles like yours have a value of about $10-15, the embossed ones can run from $25 to $200 each. This style of bottle was produced from the 1850's into the 1920's, with the same basic shape. Yours dates from the 1890-1905 time period.



Dang It !! i want to find the Money Bottle ...

I found an example of the embossed style
$T2eC16VHJFoE9nh6oVcDBQot0)vDe!~~60_35.JPG
$T2eC16VHJFoE9nh6oVcDBQot0)vDe!~~60_35.JPG (21.88 KiB) Viewed 7548 times
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by BASSMAN » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:53 pm

thebottlevault wrote:Hi Bassman, the small jar might have been a small glass for drinking the VINO CHINATO / PADRES WINE TONIC."

Your syrup / cruet glassware is pretty cool, again no real value but an unusual find. Based on the style of the pressed glass I would say 1910-1920 on that one.


Thanks!
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by av8ngreg » Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:42 pm

I unfortunately can't claim this bottle, it was found by another local diver but when he showed it to me, I stole a picture. I thought it was a really cool looking bottle, and figured you might enjoy seeing it too.
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by H20doctor » Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:10 pm

Found this on In Lake stevens on our dive tonight with My girl Echo... diggin in the goo i pulled this one out ..
I added Blue water to the bottle to help see the lettering

During the first half of the 20th century, some hock wine type bottles were produced in primarily colorless glass (sometimes with a slight pink or straw colored cast) that were elaborately embossed with the brand name VIRGINIA DARE WINES ( Garrett & Co., New York) with additional embossing of an eagle on a shield. These very common bottles held different wines produced by this company and are usually machine-made, though some early ones are mouth-blown, dating from just before Prohibition to the mid-20th century. The picture to the left is of an example that is 13" tall and has a brandy type finish and likely dates from the late 1910s or 1920s Shorter versions were also made. Later examples had an unusual brandy finish with a crown cap bead lip or upper part (1920s and 1930s) and external screw threads (40s and 50s) (date ranges estimated based on empirical observations).

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by BASSMAN » Sat May 18, 2013 6:59 pm

I want to find bottles that are earlier than the 1900's! :smt064
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by 60south » Sat May 18, 2013 8:23 pm

Found this [gin?] bottle in the shallow, rocky area near Norrander's reef (Rockaway Park on Bainbridge Is.), which was a surprise because I figured the area had been scoured years ago.

I don't expect it's worth much, but it has a nice embossed logo with a palm tree: "Palmboom CM Meyer & C" + "Schiedam"

gin1.jpg

gin2.jpg

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by 60south » Tue Jul 16, 2013 6:40 pm

Port Townsend still holds some treasures...

From today's dive: a butter pat dish (circa 1890-1910?), "Greenwood China made for J B & Sons Hotel Department" and stamped Trenton NJ; and a small bottle (4") still with a cork and holding some mystery liquid, embossed PCGW (Pacific coast Glass Works) on the bottom.

butter_pat1.jpg

butter_pat2.jpg

bottle1.jpg

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by BASSMAN » Wed Oct 16, 2013 12:05 pm

Nice find!
Hi, my name is Keith, and I'm a Dive Addict! :supz:

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Gdog » Wed Oct 16, 2013 1:25 pm

Nice thread resurrection!

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Norris
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Norris » Wed Oct 16, 2013 2:10 pm

Oh nooo where is our fantastic bottle guy?
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by spatman » Sun Oct 20, 2013 4:18 pm

I found this NuJol bottle yesterday. While it's not the most amazing looking bottle or valuable at all, the story behind the product is interesting, at least according to this treatise penned in 1949.

Thirty years ago the Standard Oil Company became impressed with the methods of the big packing houses which used, processed and sold every part of the hog but the squeal.

Their sales research department went 'way back to the 1860's when "Old Bill" Rockefeller, the itinerant pappy of John D. (the first) and a patent medicine showman, used to palm off bottled raw petroleum on the yokels as a cure for cancer.

"Old Bill" was an upstate New York farmer until 1850. He moved to Cleveland then, entered the patent medicine racket and had himself listed as a "physician" in the city directory. In selling raw petroleum in a pretty bottle "Old Bill" did nothing new. He merely took a page out of the book of other patent medicine fakirs who were then hawking their wares from the backs of wagons — covered and uncovered.

When oil was discovered in northwest Pennsylvania (1850) the jackals of the oil trade found there was more gold in the jeans of the gullible yokels than there was in working for it in the oil fields. They began to bottle the raw petroleum and palm it off under various names as a cure for everything under the sun. The popular maladies of the day were liver complaint, cholera morbus, consumption and bronchitis. Among the names given this raw petroleum were "Seneca Oil," "Rock Oil" and "American Medicinal Oil."

"Old Bill" opened up a new field for himself. He called his bottled petroleum "Nujol" (meaning new oil) and sold it to those who had cancer and those whom he could make fear they would have it.


Soon after the present-day Nujol was put on the market it was discovered by physicians to be harmful. It robbed the body of fat soluble vitamins and caused serious deficiency diseases. Standard Oil checked the loss in sales by adding carotene (one of the fat soluble vitamins) to Nujol and claiming this overcame these injuries. Physicians disagree with the sales department of Standard Oil on this point.

And what of Nujol, now being sold to the public as a laxative. For some years before his death Senator Royal S. Copeland of New York used to set up a radio microphone every morning in his Senate Office Building quarters in Washington, furnished by the American taxpayers, and plug this greasy concoction — at $75,000 a year.

The New York Senator was a doctor of sorts. Although he possessed a medical degree he was never able to make a living as a bedside practitioner. He went into politics and made medicine pay in a big way. First he became health commissioner of New York City, then a Senator from the Empire State where he used the prominence thus gained to ballyhoo Nujol to unsuspecting radio listeners.


Source: http://www.whale.to/a/bealle.htm Copyright 1949. In the United States and Canada By Morris A. Bealle
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Mateo1147 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:15 pm

spatman wrote:I found this NuJol bottle yesterday. While it's not the most amazing looking bottle or valuable at all, the story behind the product is interesting, at least according to this treatise penned in 1949.

Thirty years ago the Standard Oil Company became impressed with the methods of the big packing houses which used, processed and sold every part of the hog but the squeal.

Their sales research department went 'way back to the 1860's when "Old Bill" Rockefeller, the itinerant pappy of John D. (the first) and a patent medicine showman, used to palm off bottled raw petroleum on the yokels as a cure for cancer.

"Old Bill" was an upstate New York farmer until 1850. He moved to Cleveland then, entered the patent medicine racket and had himself listed as a "physician" in the city directory. In selling raw petroleum in a pretty bottle "Old Bill" did nothing new. He merely took a page out of the book of other patent medicine fakirs who were then hawking their wares from the backs of wagons — covered and uncovered.

When oil was discovered in northwest Pennsylvania (1850) the jackals of the oil trade found there was more gold in the jeans of the gullible yokels than there was in working for it in the oil fields. They began to bottle the raw petroleum and palm it off under various names as a cure for everything under the sun. The popular maladies of the day were liver complaint, cholera morbus, consumption and bronchitis. Among the names given this raw petroleum were "Seneca Oil," "Rock Oil" and "American Medicinal Oil."

"Old Bill" opened up a new field for himself. He called his bottled petroleum "Nujol" (meaning new oil) and sold it to those who had cancer and those whom he could make fear they would have it.


Soon after the present-day Nujol was put on the market it was discovered by physicians to be harmful. It robbed the body of fat soluble vitamins and caused serious deficiency diseases. Standard Oil checked the loss in sales by adding carotene (one of the fat soluble vitamins) to Nujol and claiming this overcame these injuries. Physicians disagree with the sales department of Standard Oil on this point.

And what of Nujol, now being sold to the public as a laxative. For some years before his death Senator Royal S. Copeland of New York used to set up a radio microphone every morning in his Senate Office Building quarters in Washington, furnished by the American taxpayers, and plug this greasy concoction — at $75,000 a year.

The New York Senator was a doctor of sorts. Although he possessed a medical degree he was never able to make a living as a bedside practitioner. He went into politics and made medicine pay in a big way. First he became health commissioner of New York City, then a Senator from the Empire State where he used the prominence thus gained to ballyhoo Nujol to unsuspecting radio listeners.


Source: http://www.whale.to/a/bealle.htm Copyright 1949. In the United States and Canada By Morris A. Bealle


Excellent post and great history of the bottle you have! :thumb3d:
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Mateo1147 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:15 pm

spatman wrote:I found this NuJol bottle yesterday. While it's not the most amazing looking bottle or valuable at all, the story behind the product is interesting, at least according to this treatise penned in 1949.

Thirty years ago the Standard Oil Company became impressed with the methods of the big packing houses which used, processed and sold every part of the hog but the squeal.

Their sales research department went 'way back to the 1860's when "Old Bill" Rockefeller, the itinerant pappy of John D. (the first) and a patent medicine showman, used to palm off bottled raw petroleum on the yokels as a cure for cancer.

"Old Bill" was an upstate New York farmer until 1850. He moved to Cleveland then, entered the patent medicine racket and had himself listed as a "physician" in the city directory. In selling raw petroleum in a pretty bottle "Old Bill" did nothing new. He merely took a page out of the book of other patent medicine fakirs who were then hawking their wares from the backs of wagons — covered and uncovered.

When oil was discovered in northwest Pennsylvania (1850) the jackals of the oil trade found there was more gold in the jeans of the gullible yokels than there was in working for it in the oil fields. They began to bottle the raw petroleum and palm it off under various names as a cure for everything under the sun. The popular maladies of the day were liver complaint, cholera morbus, consumption and bronchitis. Among the names given this raw petroleum were "Seneca Oil," "Rock Oil" and "American Medicinal Oil."

"Old Bill" opened up a new field for himself. He called his bottled petroleum "Nujol" (meaning new oil) and sold it to those who had cancer and those whom he could make fear they would have it.


Soon after the present-day Nujol was put on the market it was discovered by physicians to be harmful. It robbed the body of fat soluble vitamins and caused serious deficiency diseases. Standard Oil checked the loss in sales by adding carotene (one of the fat soluble vitamins) to Nujol and claiming this overcame these injuries. Physicians disagree with the sales department of Standard Oil on this point.

And what of Nujol, now being sold to the public as a laxative. For some years before his death Senator Royal S. Copeland of New York used to set up a radio microphone every morning in his Senate Office Building quarters in Washington, furnished by the American taxpayers, and plug this greasy concoction — at $75,000 a year.

The New York Senator was a doctor of sorts. Although he possessed a medical degree he was never able to make a living as a bedside practitioner. He went into politics and made medicine pay in a big way. First he became health commissioner of New York City, then a Senator from the Empire State where he used the prominence thus gained to ballyhoo Nujol to unsuspecting radio listeners.


Source: http://www.whale.to/a/bealle.htm Copyright 1949. In the United States and Canada By Morris A. Bealle


Excellent post and great history of the bottle you have! :thumb3d:
You breath like a girl! -Blaiz
I thought she was right until I dove with eliseaboo!

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by P2 Dive » Sun Mar 16, 2014 2:51 pm

I found these JG Fox bottles near Keystone. I know that this was a bottling company in Seattle in the early 20th century. Does anyone know what these bottles would have contained?
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Emilyrc » Sun Mar 16, 2014 4:03 pm

They used to bottle clam tea and oyster sauce as well as a million other things.

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by H20doctor » Sun Mar 16, 2014 8:35 pm

NWDC Rule #2 Pictures Or it didn't Happen

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by 60south » Tue May 06, 2014 2:29 pm

From today in Port Townsend (vis 15-20ft, excellent conditions)...

First, a small medicine bottle, embossed, with some nice purple coral around the lip.

The second one is harder to identify but in great condition; I found it under the dock just west of the Maritime Center. I think it may be a bos'n whistle from the early 1800's. Looks like it might have been in a fire or something.

bottle100.jpg
Medicine bottle.

bottle10.jpg
Bos'n whistle?
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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by Emilyrc » Tue May 06, 2014 2:34 pm

Is that what they're calling it these days?

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Re: The Bottle Thread

Post by 60south » Tue May 06, 2014 3:15 pm

It's actually the second one I've found. I can only imagine that someone takes a whopper hit and drops the thing in the water.

"Oh, Duuuude!!!!"
:der:

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